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This post is part of #GivingTuesday's #WomenWhoGive series, which celebrates women who are making a difference in their communities.

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Carolyn Jackson Taylor, Founder + CEO, My Little Light Foundation

What inspired you to start giving?

 

What inspired me to start giving to my community was my son, Ellis Joseph Taylor, who passed away at the age of 7 from a brain tumor. His last wish was to help other children with cancer. Even at a young age, charity was a very important part of his life. I am fulfilling his wish everyday by helping families battling Childhood Cancer.

What does giving mean to you? Why do you continue to give your time, talents, money, or more to your community?

Giving back is especially important to me because I am forever grateful for the financial and emotional support my family received during my son’s illness. I give my time to the community by providing charitable services to children and families affected by Childhood Cancer. We strive to inspire and improve their lives by easing some of the financial and emotional burden so they can concentrate on their loved one during this difficult time.

 

What would you tell others who are looking to start giving back?

The most important thing I would tell others that are looking to give back, is to donate your time and financial support. Volunteers and donors are a critical part of the giving community. Because of them, we are able to make a real difference in the lives of those we serve.

 

Please share a favorite moment or story from when you volunteered or donated to an organization.

My favorite story about volunteering is when we held “My Little Light Day” at St. Jude’s Affiliate Clinic. We handed out toys to the children and gift cards to the parents in the Oncology Department. One little boy came in for chemo, and when he looked over at the table filled with toys, he screamed: “They have toys, this is the best day ever.” Here was a child with cancer going through chemo and we were able to make him happy and bring some normalcy to his life that day.

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